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How to use a fire extinguisher

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How to use a fire extinguisher

How to use a fire extinguisher

In the event of a fire, you may be required to use a fire extinguisher. It is important to underst and what type of fire extinguisher to use, when to use it, and how to use it. To learn more, click the appropriate links below.

Fight or flee

Your safety is most important when it comes to extinguishing a fire. If you are unsure about whether it is safe to fight the fire, you should leave the scene and let the fire department h andle it.

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Fire extinguisher basics

Underst anding how a fire forms and how a fire extinguisher operates can help you fight a fire more effectively.

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Types of fire extinguishers

There are different types of fire extinguishers, each designed to fight a different type of fire. Using an incorrect fire extinguisher may cause a fire to intensify.

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Using a fire extinguisher

You should know exactly how to use a fire extinguisher in the event a fire develops and you feel you are safely able to fight it.

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Portable fire extinguishers – test your knowledge

Think you know everything about fire extinguishers? Test your knowledge.

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Hail storms

Hail storms

Did you know that hail is one of the biggest causes of home damage in America? Learn more about how hail damage occurs and what to look out for.

Staying safe in a hailstorm

  • If there is a hail storm in your area, make personal safety your first priority. Take shelter during the storm. Large hail can cause serious injuries.
  • Hail is often accompanied by strong winds and lightning, both of which pose their own dangers.
  • After the storm passes, keep in mind that windows may have been broken and high winds may have knocked down trees and power lines. Look for broken glass, sharp objects and live wires. Be sure to wear proper shoes and gloves when walking around your property.
  • If necessary, protect your property immediately against further damage and theft. Use plywood, tarps or other materials to cover broken windows or holes in roofs. Keep receipts for reimbursement of all expenses covered by your policy.

Underst anding hail damage

  • Hail is frozen precipitation that forms in storm clouds when super-cooled water droplets freeze on contact with dust or dirt in the air. Hailstones can be as small as the tip of a pen or as large as a softball. The larger they are, the more damage they can do.
  • By underst anding the signs of hail damage you can be better prepared to work with contractors and your claim professional after a storm.
    • Roofing:
      • Cracked or missing shingles or lost granules may be the result of hail. They also may be the result of normal wear and tear.
      • If there is damage from hail, your claim professional will determine whether the whole roof needs replacing or whether only part of the roof requires repair or replacement. This will generally depend on how extensive the hail damage is, among other factors.
    • Siding:
      • Hail may cause small dings in aluminum siding or cracks in vinyl siding. The winds that accompany the storm may pull off pieces of siding. Check your exterior walls closely for hail damage, preferably when the sun is lower in the sky (morning or evening). This will make it easier to see any denting.
      • The claim professional will determine whether one section can be replaced or the entire house needs re-siding. This will depend on the extent of the damage and the age of the siding. The claim professional will then advise you of the best way to repair the damage to achieve a reasonably uniform appearance.
  • Travelers recommends you speak with your claim professional before engaging a contractor to repair any damage. When selecting a contractor, be sure to check references. Your contactor should be insured and bonded.
  • Our claim professionals will inspect your property to determine whether it was damaged by the hailstorm. If so, we will provide you with a detailed written estimate outlining what needs to be replaced and what you can expect the repairs to cost.

Ice dams and roof snow removal for our home

Ice dams and roof snow removal

An ice dam has the potential to cause serious damage to both your roof and the inside of your home. It is important to take the right steps to protect your home from the risks associated with heavy snow and ice.

Ice dams  and roof snow removal

What is an ice dam?

An ice dam can form when water from melting snow re-freezes at the edge of your roofline. Without roof snow removal, the ice dam may grow large enough to prevent water from draining off the roof. The water can then back up underneath the roof shingles and make its way inside your home.

Immediate steps you can take:

  • Clear downspouts. An easy way to help snow and ice drain off your roof is to make sure the area around your downspouts is clear. This will make it possible for your gutters to drain when snow does melt. It will also help prevent flooding when the snow and ice melts.
  • Remove snow from your roof after every storm. Use a roof rake to clear the first three to four feet of snow from your roof immediately after each winter storm to prevent ice dams from forming. While the amount of snow and ice that your roof can h andle may vary depending on a number of factors such as the roof type, age and condition of the structure, a good rule of thumb is if there is more than a foot of heavy, wet snow and ice on your roof, you should try to have it removed.

Longer-term prevention:

Ultimately, the best prevention for ice dams is to eliminate the conditions that make it possible for them to form in the first place.

  • Insulate your attic. Make sure your attic is well insulated to help prevent the melting- and-freezing cycle that causes ice dams to form. Check and seal places where warm air could leak from your house to the attic, including vent pipes, exhaust fans, chimneys, attic hatches and light fixtures.
  • Install a water-repellant membrane. When replacing a roof, make sure to install a water membrane underneath the shingles. This acts as an extra barrier that helps prevent water from seeping inside the building.

Removing snow from your roof

Clearing the first three to four feet of snow from your roof immediately after each winter storm can help prevent ice dams from forming.

  • If you have a flat roof that is easily reached from an interior stairway, you may want to shovel the roof. When de-icing, remember to put safety first any time you are on a roof, especially one that is covered in snow and ice. If you have any doubt, leave it to the professionals.
  • If you have a sloped roof, it may be possible to remove the snow and ice using a roof rake, a long-h andled tool designed specifically for this purpose. St and on the ground and pull as much of the snow off the eaves as you can safely reach. It is not necessary to remove all the snow; removing the first three to four feet of snow closest to the gutters will help alleviate these issues.
  • If you cannot reach the roof, many homebuilders, l andscaping and roofing contractors, and property maintenance companies will remove snow and ice from roofs. Before hiring a contractor, Travelers encourages you to check references. Always be sure your contractor is insured and bonded.

We do not recommend using a ladder in snowy and icy conditions. This can be extremely dangerous and is best left to professionals.

Removing ice dams

Just because an ice dam is present does not necessarily mean water has penetrated the roof membrane. However, it is always best to remove ice dams before they have the opportunity to cause damage. To determine if you have damage, look for water stains or moisture in the attic or around the tops of exterior walls on the top floor.

  • If you can reach the roof safely, try to knock the ice dam off with a roof rake, or cut a channel through the ice to allow st anding water to drain.
  • If you cannot reach the roof safely, consider hiring a contractor to remove it.
  • Another method is to fill a nylon stocking with calcium chloride ice melt and place it vertically across the ice dam so that it melts a channel through the dam. If you try this method, make sure you can safely position the ice melt on your roof, and make sure to use calcium chloride, not rock salt. Rock salt will damage your roof. Also be aware that shrubbery and plantings near the gutter or downspout may be damaged.
  • Look carefully at large icicles. If the icicles are confined to the gutters and there is no water trapped behind them, this does not indicate the presence of an ice dam. However, large icicles can pose a danger to people when they fall off. Try to safely knock the icicles off from the ground, making sure not to st and directly beneath them. If you cannot reach them safely from the ground, consider hiring a contractor to help.

Generally speaking, property owners are responsible for the cost of preventive maintenance. However, each claim is unique, and coverage and claim decisions always require an expert analysis by a licensed Claim professional. Keep in mind that the cost of snow removal is likely to be considerably less than the cost of roof damage or interior property damage caused by water leaks.

Winter maintenance tips

Winter maintenance tips

Keep the chill out and safely enjoy the season.

Winter means rosy cheeks, but it also means harsh weather and frigid temperatures. Make sure you’re prepared for the snow and sleet by following the winter maintenance tips below.

  • Check your outlets and all electrical holiday decorations for potential fire hazards such as frayed wires or loose connections. Do not overload the outlets, extension cords or surge protectors.
  • Check and clean your heating system to make sure it is in good working condition for the winter months. This is generally a job best performed by a professional.
  • Keep adequate fuel reserves on h and because fuel carriers might not be able to refuel for several days during severe weather.
  • Close off and lower the temperature in rooms that are not in use. Make sure there is sufficient heat to prevent the freezing of water pipes.
  • Insulate pipes that pass through unheated areas. Your home’s crawlspace and attic are two such areas.
  • Clean or replace your furnace filter before the heating season begins.
  • Clean the clothes dryer exhaust duct and space under the dryer. This prevents lint from accumulating and reduces the risk of fire.
  • Service snow removal equipment, and keep ice melting compound on h and to melt ice on walkways.
  • Set the heat in your home no lower than 55 degrees.
  • Remove screens from windows, and install storm windows.
  • Protect your roof against heavy snow and ice loads. Keep gutters clean and roof drains open.
  • Inspect washing machine hoses periodically, and replace hoses that show signs of wear or leakage.
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