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About Winter Sports Travel Insurance

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About Winter Sports Travel Insurance

As the days grow shorter and summer becomes a memory, many of us will be turning our thoughts towards planning a winter vacation, especially one involving winter sports such as skiing. Travel insurance is an often overlooked part of holiday planning, but if you plan on taking part in sporting activites then it really is essential.

A normal travel insurance policy will probably not be up to the st andard you need for winter sports, and if things go wrong you could be left facing a huge bill. So what features should you be looking for in a policy?

– Injury Cover

No matter how accomplished a skiier you are, hurtling down a mountain is always going to be more risky than simply lying on a beach working on a tan. And if you do have an accident, a mountainside isn’t the easiest place for medical services to reach. If you’re unlucky enough to need a mountain rescue or airlift to hospital, you’ll be facing a bill running into the thous ands even before you get medical attention. This sort of expense is likely to be specifically excluded on a st andard insurance policy, but will be an integral part of almost any winter sports cover.

– Equipment

Most winter sports require expensive equipment, and where there are valuables there’s always the chance of theft. Your insurance should provide enough cover to fully replace your equipment with br and new items if necessary, right there at the resort. Even if you plan to hire your equipment, the hire company will probably require insurance – and your own policy is likely to be cheaper than the st andard one they’ll try to sell you.

– Liability

Even the best skiiers or snowboarders can be involved in an accident in which someone else gets injured. Whether or not an accident is your fault, you could end up being taken to court and this is usually a long and expensive process. A decent insurance policy will cover costs from any legal proceedings and / or compensation payments.

– Closure of Piste

If bad weather (or warm weather!) means that the pistes are closed and you can’t ski, your policy should pay you compensation to cover the costs of any pre-booked lessons or lift fees, and many will even include a payment simply to cover the inconvenience of not being able to ski.

– Off Piste

A final point to note is that a st andard winter sports policy will probably only cover you for accidents that occur when skiing on designated pistes. If you plan to go off-piste, then make sure your insurance will cover this – you’ll probably have to pay a supplement.

As with most kinds of insurance, paying out for travel insurance can seem like a waste of money. However, if you find yourself caught up in an accident on the mountainside then the costs involved can be truly frightening and you’ll be glad you took the time to arrange adequate cover in advance!

A winter storm is bearing down. Are you ready?

A winter storm is bearing down.
Are you ready?

Bitter temperatures, howling winds and icy precipitation can easily turn a pretty winter snowfall into a dangerous event.

With a storm now on your doorstep, here are a few things you can do to stay safe and warm while the storm
passes through.

Check your supplies. Make sure you have a snow shovel and ice melt to keep walkways clear and safe. Check that you have sufficient heating fuel for your home and fuel for your generator, if you have one. If you will be using a fireplace or wood-burning stove, you should have a good supply of dry, seasoned wood. Have warm clothing and blankets on h and and stock non-perishable food items and necessary medications to last you and your family several days.

Get ready for a power outage. Turn your heat up now and close off any rooms that are not in use. Check pipe insulation and allow water to run at a trickle to prevent pipes from freezing. Charge your battery-powered electronic and communications devices. A battery-powered radio can help keep you aware of changing weather conditions. Get out your flashlights, batteries, first aid kit and other emergency supplies.

Stay warm – and safe. If you start a wood-burning fire, follow all fireplace safety precautions. Do not use an oven or a range as a home heating device. If you have a generator, use it outside only, where there is sufficient ventilation. Test all of your smoke and carbon monoxide alarms to ensure they work properly. Do not let c andles burn unattended, and keep them away from combustibles. LED c andles are a safe, energy efficient alternative. Also, if you have an ice dam prevention system, turn it on before the snow starts to fall.

Stay inside – and safe. Drive only if you absolutely must, and be sure your car is outfitted with snow tires, has adequate fuel and an emergency supply kit. If you go outside to shovel, know your limits and try not to overtax your body.
Protect yourself from frostbite and hypothermia by wearing layers of warm, loose-fitting, lightweight clothing. Stay away from any downed power lines you may see. Keep your pets inside, or make other suitable arrangements for them.

We at Travelers hope these measures will help get you through the storm safely and comfortably.

Find more suggestions on long-term planning for a winter storm by visiting our page on winterizing your home.

Winter maintenance tips

Winter maintenance tips

Keep the chill out and safely enjoy the season.

Winter means rosy cheeks, but it also means harsh weather and frigid temperatures. Make sure you’re prepared for the snow and sleet by following the winter maintenance tips below.

  • Check your outlets and all electrical holiday decorations for potential fire hazards such as frayed wires or loose connections. Do not overload the outlets, extension cords or surge protectors.
  • Check and clean your heating system to make sure it is in good working condition for the winter months. This is generally a job best performed by a professional.
  • Keep adequate fuel reserves on h and because fuel carriers might not be able to refuel for several days during severe weather.
  • Close off and lower the temperature in rooms that are not in use. Make sure there is sufficient heat to prevent the freezing of water pipes.
  • Insulate pipes that pass through unheated areas. Your home’s crawlspace and attic are two such areas.
  • Clean or replace your furnace filter before the heating season begins.
  • Clean the clothes dryer exhaust duct and space under the dryer. This prevents lint from accumulating and reduces the risk of fire.
  • Service snow removal equipment, and keep ice melting compound on h and to melt ice on walkways.
  • Set the heat in your home no lower than 55 degrees.
  • Remove screens from windows, and install storm windows.
  • Protect your roof against heavy snow and ice loads. Keep gutters clean and roof drains open.
  • Inspect washing machine hoses periodically, and replace hoses that show signs of wear or leakage.