Serving you through Covid-19

bbb
Serving you through Covid-19

Critical Illness Insurance – Too Important to Live Without

Home

Critical Illness Insurance – Too Important to Live Without

There are numerous insurance policies from you to choose from.  From the serious to the not-so-serious, it can get extremely confusing trying to determine which policies work best for both your personal and professional life.  One type of insurance that has been found to be extremely important is Critical Illness Insurance.

Critical illness Insurance is a policy that provides financial protection to individuals and may be purchased in conjunction with/in addition to life insurance.  On a very basic level, Critical Illness Insurance allows a cash payment to be made to the policyholder in the event they are diagnosed with a specific illness – which is usually on a pre-determined list within the policy.  The terms are defined within the policy and include specific rules regarding the diagnosis of a critical illness and any specific medical tests required to ensure validity.

The Critical illnesses covered within the policy varies between insurance companies.  When Critical Illness Insurance was first offered, only four conditions were originally covered – heart attack, cancer, stroke and coronary artery by-pass surgery. Now other conditions that might be covered include: Alzheimer’s disease, blindness, kidney failure, organ transplant, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, paralysis of limb, heart attack, cancer, and stroke.  Again, the list of covered Critical Illness will be determined by the insurance company.

The cash payment from the insurance company to the policyholder can be used for paying for treatment, doctor visits, medication, medical supplies, bills, lost income, required change in lifestyle, financial protection for dependents, repayment of mortgage and additional items the policyholder bear as a financial burden due to a critical illness event.

So what happens if you or a loved one suffers from a heart attack this year? A stroke? Any other Critical Illness?  Often times tis medical issues happened without any notice or symptoms – meaning you are unprepared for the situation and unprepared for the aftermath.  Major medical insurance covers most of the fees involved, but not all.  How will you cover the costs leftover from an unexpected medical event?  Can you afford the out-of-pocket expenses?  Wouldn’t it be relief to know that you could receive a CASH payment from your insurance company that will provide you with all the assistance you require?

Critical Illness Insurance offers a significant level of protection – protection that you can’t afford to live without.

critical-illness

 

 

Do You Need Life Insurance

It can be very difficult to decide if you need life insurance. Life insurance can be an extremely onerous financial commitment and investment, and it will also last for a considerable period of time, so you should take careful consideration in deciding if it is the best way of achieving the financial and other goals you and your loved ones may have.

Life Insurance Policy

Basically, a life insurance policy will cause a sum to be paid to the named beneficiary upon the death of the insured. This sum will generally be paid to the beneficiary, free of income tax. So in which instances is life insurance generally used above its alternatives? Well its primary function is to provide death benefit protection in a tax efficient way. For example, if you would like to transfer wealth from your estate to your beneficiaries you can do it through life insurance.

You should now that it may still be liable to federal estate taxes. It can also be used to ensure the continuation or protection of a business and to provide financial benefits to your partners or employees who may otherwise be at risk financially. It may also be used to support your family or other dependents that rely on your income during life. It can replace this income and support them in your place for a period. It can also be used to supplement retirement income in various instances when other contributions are not possible.

Be Aware

You can access the money in your policy unless it is a Modified Endowment Contract. What’s more, it will be federal income tax free so long as you make the withdrawal by borrowing against the policy and do not exceed what you have paid into the policy. Withdrawals from an MEC are subject to federal income tax on the gains they have made. There is an additional 10% tax in certain situations.

You should be aware that all withdrawals and loans against a permanent life insurance policy would reduce the policy’s value and the amount of any pay out upon death of the insured. There may also be various fees and penalties associated with accessing the money early so you should be aware of these and if they are very onerous, you may wish to look for an alternative source of funds so that you don’t have to fall prey to these. Also, if your policy is invested on your behalf, the amount available for withdrawal or loans may be less or more than what you have paid in, depending on how your investments perform.

Throw The Sales Pitch Out The Window And Find Affordable Disability Insurance From Reliable Companies

Come one, come all to this disability insurance blowout! You know you can become injured to the point where you can’t lift a finger at work. What plans do you have to take care of your family while you are disabled? You have no savings after blowing that wad of cash on that secret fishing boat moored at your parents’ house so your wife doesn’t find out. Without a savings and out of work with this injury, you will be in dire need of funds.

Get your disability insurance from us before these unfortunate work accidents happen. We will give you the highest rates we possibly can. Our rates are so high, we make greedy bankers blush. As for some perks for getting the insurance from us, we will give you a toaster. Isn’t that great? A br and new, or maybe slightly used, toaster with a small dent on the side and bread crumbs at the bottom. Hey, salespeople have to eat too."

Thank Heavens that not all disability insurance companies are like the one above. Today, you can shop for the right disability insurance company that will give you the affordable rates you want that won’t break your budget. You can find great deals from reliable insurance companies that will offer more than high rates and a toaster as a prize.

These insurance companies will provide you with a policy that gives you the exact coverage you need. If you are injured, you and your family will be taken care of as you will have enough money to pay for all of your expenses. Let the greedy salespeople keep their beat-up toaster.

Can I insure my income? (yes with Disability Insurance)

Did you know there is insurance that can pay you NOT TO WORK?

When I first heard that such a thing existed, immediately my mind went into overdrive. “Insurance that will pay me NOT to work”. There must be a catch.

You see, previously I had heard about this other thing called life insurance. As it turns out you had to die to collect, and that wasn’t for me. But this new stuff would pay me not to work, and I didn’t have to take a dirt nap.

It is called disability insurance, and it will make payments directly to you if you can’t work due to a disability. This had promise, I thought. People after all have referred to me as having a multitude of disabilities. Seems none of those qualified however.

So, I started doing some more research. Seems disability insurance can be tied into something called “significant gainful activity”. It’s referred to as SGA in the business. Anyway, if I have disability insurance and I have “…an impairment, either medical, psychological, or psychiatric in nature” that keeps me from being able to do substantial gainful activity, than I am sitting pretty. Of course I would have to check to see if "sitting pretty" is a gainful activity.

My mind was spinning again. Which one should I choose?

Medical? “Sounds uncomfortable” I thought.

Psychological? No, I can’t wrap my brain around that one.

Psychiatric? “Hmmm, this has potential.” I said aloud. I quickly looked around to see who was paying attention to me, but they disappeared.

“Naw, they would never go for it.”

Who Needs Disability Insurance?

Any insurance policy is designed to protect the policy owner from suffering financial loss when their life is changed by a disastrous event. But what happens when life is changed because of an injury or illness  and you have to stop working in order to recover? The answer is without a disability insurance policy the injured will lose money and will not be able to pay their bills.

Disability insurance is a product that is designed to protect people from life changing disasters and financial destruction. If you end up getting hurt or sick and can’t work,  you will end up with some pretty serious medical bills and a loss of income. The person who got hurt may feel that the source of the injury should be the one who pays for their injuries. While that may be true that the responsible party should care for the expenses of the injury the truth is it will take a long time for the issue to be settled in court. While you are waiting for the settlement your bills will continue to pile up. If you had purchased a disability insurance policy, you would have an income to meet the expenses of everyday life.

The benefits of a disability policy are fairly simple.

  • The protection that it gives to the policy owner is priceless. The policy helps by keeping the st andard of living close to what it was before the injury. It pays wages that would otherwise be lost because of lost hours..
  • The money the policy pays is allowed to be used for the expenses of everyday life. It can be used to pay for food, overdue bills or any other expense that you may have.
  • Depending on the policy it can also cover rehabilitation needs of the injured.
  • The coverage amounts can continue as long as the individual is still under medical care. The coverage usually ends when the policy owner can return to work or is released by the doctor.
  • The policy pays for the medical bills of the injured. It will pay for all the scans and test that are needed to help the person get well.

This type of policy should also be purchased by anybody who works and has the potential to get injured or ill, which is, well everybody!  No one should lose their income and way of life because of an injury or serious illness.  Talk to one of our agents today.

Karl Susman, Susman Insurance Agency

In the Spotlight: Disability Statistics

How secure will Social Security help you be if you are unable to work? It is emotionally difficult to prepare for the possibility that you may suffer a disability as a result of an accident or illness, but it is financially imperative to plan. Your quality of life tomorrow may depend on your efforts today.

The Latest Figures

The Social Security Administration (SSA, 2010) estimates that three in ten of today’s 20-year-olds will suffer a disability before reaching age 67.1 In another sobering statistic, the SSA reports that 69% of the private sector workforce has no long-term disability insurance.2 Essentially, seven out of ten workers would have to rely on their own personal savings, limited state-run insurance, and Social Security for replacement income in the event they could not work because of a disability. In 2009, the estimated average monthly Social Security benefit for all disabled workers was $1,006.3 Over the course of a year, that totals approximately $12,072, and for many workers and their families, that is significantly less than their annual expenses.

Men vs. Women

Throughout history, men have generally earned more than women. The SSA reports (2010) that as of the year 2007, the average salary for women was 78% of the average for men.4 This disparity affects women in two ways. Because disability benefits are based on earnings, the benefits for disabled male workers are typically higher than those of disabled female workers. However, the spousal benefit for widows is generally higher than that of widowers for the same reason—the median income of men is higher than that of women. These demographic trends are important to consider for families planning their financial security.

Supplemental Income Sources

In addition to Social Security and personal savings, there are additional options for workers and their families. Personal disability income insurance is a viable option for workers looking to manage the risk of losing their income. It offers coverage beyond workers compensation, which is state-run insurance that replaces a percentage of an employee’s income only for injuries that occur on the job or illnesses that are work-related.

Disability income insurance policies vary, but here are some key questions to ask:

  • Are you covered for both accidents and illness?
  • Does the policy define disability as the inability to perform your own job or any gainful employment?
  • How long must you wait before benefits begin?
  • How long will benefits last?
  • Does the policy offer cost-of-living adjustments?
  • Are benefits available for total and/or partial disability?
  • What percentage of income will the policy replace?

Disability income insurance policies contain, exclusions, limitations, reductions of benefits and terms for keeping them in force.  Speak with your representative for costs and complete details.

If you lack insurance against disability, or are underinsured, you are possibly exposing yourself to serious financial risk. Avoid becoming another statistic—plan your future today.

1The Social Security Administration, “Social Security Protection If You Become Disabled,”

www.ssa.gov/dibplan/index.htm.

2The Social Security Administration, “Social Security Basic Facts,” www.ssa.gov/pressoffice/basicfact.htm.

3The Social Security Administration, “2009 Social Security Changes,” www.ssa.gov/pressoffice/factsheets/colafacts2009.htm.

4The Social Security Administration, “Social Security Is Important to Women,” www.ssa.gov/pressoffice/factsheets/women.htm.

Copyright ã 2010 Liberty Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved.

L0410101948(exp0511)(All States)(DC)

This article appears courtesy of Karl Susman. Karl Susman is a representative of the New Engl and Life Insurance Company. He focuses on meeting the individual insurance and financial services needs of people on the West Coast. You can reach Karl at the office at (424) 785-4337. New Engl and Life Insurance Company, 501 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02116

Seven Steps to a Sound Financial Future

Today, many people find themselves bombarded by a constant stream of financial news from television, radio, and the Internet. Yet, does all this “information age” data really help you manage your finances any better than in the past? The truth often is that the “old-fashioned” practices, such as periodic financial reviews, lead to greater success in the long run. Why not spend a few hours reviewing your finances? The changes you make today could result in increased savings. Consider these seven steps:

Analyze your cash flow. When your income is greater than your expenses, the excess is called a positive cash flow. When your expenses exceed your income, the shortfall is termed a negative cash flow. A positive cash flow means that you may have funds you can set aside as savings. A negative cash flow can indicate that it may be a good idea to reorganize your budget to minimize any unnecessary expenses.

Develop a program for special goals. For every financial and retirement goal you establish, identify a projected cost, a time horizon (how long it will take to reach the goal), and a funding method (such as through savings, liquidating assets, or taking a loan). Consider your goals in terms of a “hierarchy of importance.” The bottom—or “foundation” tier—should include emergency funds to cover at least three months’ worth of living expenses. The middle tier should include such essentials as your children’s education. On the top tier, place the “nice-to-haves,” such as a new car, home renovation, or vacation.

Boost your retirement savings. Employer-sponsored pensions and Social Security may not provide sufficient income to maintain your existing lifestyle when you retire. Thus, it is essential to identify your retirement needs and plan a disciplined savings program for the future. Maximize your contributions to retirement accounts, and if possible, make “catch-up” contributions.

Taxpayers, who are 50 years old, or older, are allowed to make additional contributions to their retirement plans. Traditional Individual Retirement Account (IRA) and eligible Roth IRA holders can save an extra $1,000 a year in 2010. Those with eligible 401(k), 403(b), or 457 plans can save an additional $5,500 in 2010.

Minimize income taxes. Why give Uncle Sam any more of your money than is necessary? It is in your interest to take advantage of all income tax deductions to which you are entitled. Consider exploring any possible ways of reducing your income taxes. For instance, under appropriate circumstances, losses or expenses from prior years may be carried over to the next tax year. A qualified tax professional can help you implement a tax strategy that meets your needs.

Beat inflation. Your income and retirement savings must keep pace with inflation in order to maintain your buying power. This means that if the inflation rate is currently 3%, you need to achieve at least a 3% annual increase in income just to break even. If your long-term savings plan fails to keep pace with inflation, you may be unable to maintain your current st andard of living.

Manage unexpected risks. As you undoubtedly know, life can sometimes throw you a “curve ball.” Without warning, a disability or untimely death can cause financial hardship for your family. Adequate insurance is an important foundation for your financial program—it offers the protection you need to help cover potential risks and liabilities.

Consult a financial professional. In today’s complex financial world, everyone needs help in making informed decisions. A qualified financial professional can help ensure that your financial affairs are consistent with your current needs and long-term goals.

Reviews can help bring focus to your overall financial picture. In the future, you will have the opportunity to alter your programs due to changing goals and circumstances. By faithfully tracking your progress, you will be in a better position to build financial security and realize the retirement of your dreams.

Pursuant to IRS Circular 230, MetLife is providing you with the following notification: The information contained in this article is not intended to— and cannot—be used by anyone to avoid IRS penalties. This article supports the promotion and marketing of insurance and/or other financial products and services. You should seek advice based on your particular circumstances from an independent tax advisor.

MetLife, its affiliates, agents, and representatives may not give legal or tax advice. Any discussion of taxes herein or related to this document is for general information purposes only and does not purport to be complete or cover every situation. Tax law is subject to interpretation and legislative change. Tax results and the appropriateness of any product for any specific taxpayer may vary depending on the facts and circumstances. You should consult with and rely on your own independent legal and tax advisers regarding your particular set of facts and circumstances.

Copyright © 2010 Liberty Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

L0910131535(exp1211)(All States)(DC)

This article appears courtesy of Karl Susman. Karl Susman is a representative of the New Engl and Life Insurance Company. He focuses on meeting the individual insurance and financial services needs of people on the West Coast. You can reach Karl at the office at (424) 785-4337. New Engl and Life Insurance Company, 501 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02116

How Much Can You Earn and Still Receive Social Security?

Retirees are often ready, willing, and able to start new careers or businesses late in life that may earn them valuable incomes. However, some may feel that it is not worthwhile to work for wages, only to have to “give up” some of those earnings in the form of higher income taxes. Frustrating as that may sound, it is important to underst and the fundamentals of Social Security income and taxation so you can make your retirement years more “golden” and less “taxing.”

Income Limits—Paying to Work?

The first factor you must consider is your age and the so-called Social Security “giveback.” If you are age 62 or older, under the full retirement age (65–67 depending on your birth year), and receiving reduced Social Security benefits, you must “give back” $1 for every $2 earned above $14,160 in 2010. If you attain full retirement age in 2010, your benefits will be reduced by $1 for each $3 earned over $37,680. Upon attainment of full retirement age, you may earn as much as you like and Social Security benefits are not reduced.

How Much Is Taxable?

A second factor affecting your Social Security benefits is the potential income taxation of those benefits. Let’s assume you are working and you also receive a check from the Social Security Administration (SSA) each month. You must first determine how much, if any, of your benefit is included in your gross taxable income. The first step in estimating this is to add up the following items: your wages, taxable pensions, interest, dividends, and other taxable income; all tax-exempt interest; any exclusions from income; your net earnings (net income less net losses) from self-employment; and half of your Social Security benefits.

This total is then compared to a first-tier threshold of $25,000 for a single taxpayer or a married taxpayer who is filing separately and lived apart from his or her spouse for the entire year, or $32,000 for a married taxpayer filing jointly. For a married taxpayer filing separately, who lived with his or her spouse for any period during the year, the first-tier threshold is $0.

For the sake of illustration, suppose your total applicable earnings are $27,000, and you are married and filing jointly. Since the total does not exceed the applicable threshold amount of $32,000, then no portion of your Social Security benefit is taxable. However, if the total exceeds the applicable threshold amount, a further, more complicated, calculation must be performed to determine the amount of your benefits that are taxable. You can refer to IRS Publication 915, Social Security and Equivalent Railroad Retirement Benefits, for more information, or consult your financial or tax professional.

As you can see, performing these calculations is no simple task. Thus, it is important for anyone who is thinking about taking Social Security benefits while still working to underst and the potential tax consequences and to plan accordingly. As with all tax planning matters, it is wise to consult a tax professional to help ensure your planning decisions are consistent with your overall goals.

Pursuant to IRS Circular 230, MetLife is providing you with the following notification: The information contained in this document is not intended to ( and cannot) be used by anyone to avoid IRS penalties. This document supports the promotion and marketing of insurance products. You should seek advice based on your particular circumstances from an independent tax advisor.

MetLife, its agents, and representatives may not give legal or tax advice. Any discussion of taxes herein or related to this document is for general information purposes only and does not purport to be complete or cover every situation. Tax law is subject to interpretation and legislative change. Tax results and the appropriateness of any product for any specific taxpayer may vary depending on the facts and circumstances. You should consult with and rely on your own independent legal and tax advisors regarding your particular set of facts and circumstances.

Copyright ã 2010 Liberty Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved.

L0510108090(exp0511)(All States)(DC)

This article appears courtesy of Karl Susman. Karl Susman is a representative of the New Engl and Life Insurance Company. He focuses on meeting the individual insurance and financial services needs of people on the West Coast. You can reach Karl at the office at (424) 785-4337. New Engl and Life Insurance Company, 501 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02116

Life Insurance–How Much Is Enough?

You are probably aware of the importance of having enough life insurance coverage to h andle the financial contingencies that may affect your family in the event of your death. However, determining the necessary amount of life insurance can be complicated. One general rule of thumb is that you should have enough coverage to equal five to seven times your annual salary. However, you may want to determine the “right” amount of life insurance coverage with a careful “needs analysis,” rather than using an arbitrary formula.

The needs analysis approach incorporates an evaluation of your family’s most important financial obligations and goals. This leads to planning insurance coverage to help address mortgage debt, college expenses, and future family income, as well as to provide liquidity for meeting future estate tax liabilities.

Mortgage Debt

The first point worthy of consideration is whether your life insurance proceeds will be sufficient to help pay the remaining mortgage on your home. If you are carrying a large mortgage, you may need a sizable amount. If you own a second home, that mortgage should also be factored into the formula.

College Expenses

Many people want life insurance proceeds large enough to help cover their children’s college expenses, and possibly, graduate school. The amount needed can be roughly calculated by matching the ages of your children against projected college costs adjusted for inflation. This calculation should be revised periodically as your children get closer to college age, and it may be a good idea to be as conservative as possible when estimating long-term savings goals.

Continuing Income for Your Family

The amount of income you will need to help provide for your surviving spouse and dependents will vary greatly according to your age, health, retirement plan benefits, Social Security benefits, other assets, and your spouse’s earning power. Many surviving spouses may already be employed or will find employment, but your spouse’s income, alone, may not be sufficient enough to cover the monthly expenses of your family’s current lifestyle. Providing a supplemental income fund can help your family maintain its st andard of living.

Estate Taxes

Life insurance has long been recognized as an effective method for establishing liquidity at death to pay estate taxes and maximize asset transfers to future generations. However, this use of life insurance requires qualified legal expertise to help ensure the proper results.

Existing Resources

If your current assets and retirement plan death benefits are sufficient to cover your financial needs and obligations, you may not need additional life insurance for these purposes. However, if they are inadequate, the difference between your total assets and your total needs may be funded with life insurance.

There are many factors to consider when completing a needs analysis. In addition to the areas already mentioned, some other questions you might want to address include the following:

1. How much will Social Security provide and for how long?

2. How do you “inflation-proof” your family income, so the real purchasing power of those dollars does not decrease?

3. What is the earning potential of your surviving spouse?

4. How often should you review your needs analysis?

5. How can you use life insurance to help provide retirement income?

6. How do you structure your estate to reduce the impact of estate taxes?

7. Which assets are liquid and which would not be reduced by a forced sale?

8. Which assets would you want your family to retain because of sentiment or future growth possibilities?

As you develop an insurance strategy, remember to analyze your existing policies. Calculate the additional coverage you may need based on your family’s financial obligations and any other resources, such as retirement benefits and savings. Remember, having the proper life insurance coverage can play a major role in any family’s financial protection.

MetLife, its agents, and representatives may not give legal or tax advice. Any discussion of taxes herein or related to this document is for general information purposes only and does not purport to be complete or cover every situation. Tax law is subject to interpretation and legislative change. Tax results and the appropriateness of any product for any specific taxpayer may vary depending on the facts and circumstances. You should consult with and rely on your own independent legal and tax advisers regarding your particular set of facts and circumstances.

Copyright © 2010 Liberty Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

L0410101464(exp0411)(All States)(DC)

This article appears courtesy of Karl Susman.  Karl Susman is a representative of the New Engl and Life Insurance Company. He focuses on meeting the individual insurance and financial services needs of people on the West Coast.  You can reach Karl at the office at (424) 785-4337. New Engl and Life Insurance Company, 501 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02116

Life Insurance—How Much Is Enough?

You are probably aware of the importance of having enough life insurance coverage to h andle the financial contingencies that may affect your family in the event of your death. However, determining the necessary amount of life insurance can be complicated. One general rule of thumb is that you should have enough coverage to equal five to seven times your annual salary. However, you may want to determine the “right” amount of life insurance coverage with a careful “needs analysis,” rather than using an arbitrary formula.

The needs analysis approach incorporates an evaluation of your family’s most important financial obligations and goals. This leads to planning insurance coverage to help address mortgage debt, college expenses, and future family income, as well as to provide liquidity for meeting future estate tax liabilities.

Mortgage Debt

The first point worthy of consideration is whether your life insurance proceeds will be sufficient to help pay the remaining mortgage on your home. If you are carrying a large mortgage, you may need a sizable amount. If you own a second home, that mortgage should also be factored into the formula.

College Expenses

Many people want life insurance proceeds large enough to help cover their children’s college expenses, and possibly, graduate school. The amount needed can be roughly calculated by matching the ages of your children against projected college costs adjusted for inflation. This calculation should be revised periodically as your children get closer to college age, and it may be a good idea to be as conservative as possible when estimating long-term savings goals.

Continuing Income for Your Family

The amount of income you will need to help provide for your surviving spouse and dependents will vary greatly according to your age, health, retirement plan benefits, Social Security benefits, other assets, and your spouse’s earning power. Many surviving spouses may already be employed or will find employment, but your spouse’s income, alone, may not be sufficient enough to cover the monthly expenses of your family’s current lifestyle. Providing a supplemental income fund can help your family maintain its st andard of living.

Estate Taxes

Life insurance has long been recognized as an effective method for establishing liquidity at death to pay estate taxes and maximize asset transfers to future generations. However, this use of life insurance requires qualified legal expertise to help ensure the proper results.

Existing Resources

If your current assets and retirement plan death benefits are sufficient to cover your financial needs and obligations, you may not need additional life insurance for these purposes. However, if they are inadequate, the difference between your total assets and your total needs may be funded with life insurance.

There are many factors to consider when completing a needs analysis. In addition to the areas already mentioned, some other questions you might want to address include the following:

1. How much will Social Security provide and for how long?

2. How do you “inflation-proof” your family income, so the real purchasing power of those dollars does not decrease?

3. What is the earning potential of your surviving spouse?

4. How often should you review your needs analysis?

5. How can you use life insurance to help provide retirement income?

6. How do you structure your estate to reduce the impact of estate taxes?

7. Which assets are liquid and which would not be reduced by a forced sale?

8. Which assets would you want your family to retain because of sentiment or future growth possibilities?

As you develop an insurance strategy, remember to analyze your existing policies. Calculate the additional coverage you may need based on your family’s financial obligations and any other resources, such as retirement benefits and savings. Remember, having the proper life insurance coverage can play a major role in any family’s financial protection.

This article appears courtesy of Karl Susman.  Karl Susman is a representative of the New Engl and Life Insurance Company. He focuses on meeting the individual insurance and financial services needs of people on the West Coast.  You can reach Karl at the office at (424) 785-4337. New Engl and Life Insurance Company, 501 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02116

 

MetLife, its agents, and representatives may not give legal or tax advice. Any discussion of taxes herein or related to this document is for general information purposes only and does not purport to be complete or cover every situation. Tax law is subject to interpretation and legislative change. Tax results and the appropriateness of any product for any specific taxpayer may vary depending on the facts and circumstances. You should consult with and rely on your own independent legal and tax advisers regarding your particular set of facts and circumstances.

Copyright © 2011 Liberty Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

L0410101464(exp0411)(All States)(DC)

Close Bitnami banner
Bitnami