Many individuals deal with the build up of fluids inside of the middle ear. This can be anything from ear wax to actual water and other liquids that are lodged inside of the middle ear and not able to drain properly. This can cause both pain inside of the ear and temporary hearing loss. In order to drain this fluid from the ear, a procedure known as myringotomy is performed. This particular procedure is designed to cut a small incision into the eardrum, which helps relieve the pressure and drain the ear. A tube is often inserted into the ear drum in order to keep the ear clear of fluid as it drains. Once the procedure is complete and the ear is completely drained, it is possible to have the tube removed. If no tube is required than it might be just a few weeks before the entire ear drum is healed up. However, if a tube is required, than it means there is a rather substantial amount of fluid, which in turn means the process is usually extended out to six months or a full year, depending on how well the ear drains and stays clear of fluid.

See the parts involved in Myringotomy
See the parts involved in Myringotomy

After the procedure, the individual just needs to make sure to protect their ears from fluids. Usually, while swimming, it is very important for the individual to wear ear plugs and other protective items to prevent liquids from going into the ear. Something that is thicker, such as ear putty, is required for swimming in dirtier water locations, including lakes, rivers, oceans and any other body of water that does not utilize chlorine to clean out material. Without the ear putty, an individual is likely to suffer from ear infections, due to the tube leading directly into the middle ear canal.